Being Mortgage Free and Green Space

Different parts of the world have different regulation laws but here in the UK it’s very difficult to acquire land to build on or even have a static dwelling on. I’ve spent months exploring all the possibilities as I’d love to help people who can’t afford a home by renting out caravans and static homes cheaply.

There’s a great TV Programme with some brilliant ideas named How to Live Mortgage Free with Sarah Beeny. The show is full of inspiration.

There was a single dad who was paying over £1,000 a month in rent and bills whilst taking care of his daughter for half the week. Expensive times. So he invested in a van called a Silver Bullet from the USA. It cost £11,000 to include the importation costs. He then ripped out the inside and re-designed it to be more suitable for him and his daughter. He found a good site to put the van on. There’s a way round most problems we just need to find outlets that give us more information.

This is a smaller version that I found on the web but it gives a general ideal. They’re pretty cool.

van

There’s more and more people living off grid. I was almost homeless myself a few years ago so I feel a small obligation to try help others facing similar circumstances. The Councils in the UK have rigid laws where they try their best to make as much money as possible through every circumstance. They create red-tape and boundaries which takes away most of the freedom we could benefit from with all the green-space that could be used to set up communities. It sickens me. But we can keep trying to change this. Less is More. Be Kind – Love is Everything and nobody needs to put up with hardship. There’s always a way if we find the right advice. Small steps …

Tiffany. X

10 thoughts on “Being Mortgage Free and Green Space

  1. We have chosen to live in two small cottages– not tiny, but much smaller than average. One is south and one is north. As we move into retirement we plan to use the southern one to rent during the peak tourist season and live there in the winter when the north is a bit too harsh. This allows us to be mortgage free and bring in a little money as we head into retirement. We found that small houses (a couple of small rooms and one main room) allow us to still entertain others without feeling cramped. I admire the father you described and what a lovely buggy!

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    1. That’s very interesting. I’ve done something similar. I have a small home in Leeds and static space in two other places. I am intrigued by your story. I have a friend who has a nice house with a log cabin in the garden I sometimes rent from her as a holiday. It works. It’s a real income for her. We can do more with our own land. It’s refreshing to hear your story. Stay in touch. Thanks for sharing!

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      1. The house north we keep much more personalized. The one south is actually being rented full time at the moment, but once the renter moves on we will rehab with materials that are easy to keep clean and ensure it is simply decorated so that we may keep it neutral for short term renters. It is better to have two small homes than one larger one I think to achieve this kind of flexibility. We always know where we are going on vacation too! This save funds as we go home and “go home.” Certainly I’ll keep in touch.

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      2. You’ve hit the nail on the head. You really have. We just need to think outside the box. By having 2 homes instead of a larger one we can help others afford space and get an income too. It makes sense! You’ve made my day!

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  2. I must have that Scooby Doo Mystery Machine dream van. And Evie your dog. Together we will go on adventures exposing scheming masked theme ark owners everywhere. I just need to get a Thelma, a Daphne, and that other sexually ambivalent dude – what was his name. Hank? With the neckerchief and white v neck. NO SCRAPPY DOO THOUGH. I draw the line there. My van, my rules.

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